Tuesday, 11 October 2016

Lighting quick


It’s not uncommon for the Great British weather to cause us maintenance problems, after all, rain, snow and wind can cause lots of damage.

It was slightly more surprising, though, to discover recently that lighting had been the cause of an issue at some of our homes in Stanley, County Durham.

At first, we were called to what we thought would be a routine repair, namely a boiler that had stopped working.

But it was only when one of our contractors went to the home that they discovered there was a lot more to it.

The clue came when the contractor saw sparks coming from a phone socket. He put two and two together and realised the thunderstorm the night before had been the culprit, with a few of our houses having been hit by lighting.

Thankfully, no-one was injured but it was particularly pleasing to see how quickly our contractors responded to the situation.

We are too small to have our own in-house maintenance team so we rely on a roster of local contractors. These contractors are small, local companies, with many other jobs to do, other than ours, but they dropped everything to come to our assistance.

So we would like to thank our electricians Vince Elwick & Son and heating engineers Phil Dobson Gas Technical Services.

Great work guys; now, we are hoping that lighting doesn’t strike twice!

Thursday, 26 May 2016

Retirement housing



I read with interest a report on retirement housing from the National House Building Council Foundation.

As part of the report, people aged 55 and over were asked to share their experiences of living in private sector retirement housing.

The research showed that residents’ needs are being met and that they are enjoying life, which is great.

Whilst the report focused on the private sector, the fact it demonstrates a need for good quality, affordable housing for older people is good news for social housing providers too.

Not everyone can afford to buy a home, or circumstances change which mean they need to find something smaller which meets their changing needs, e.g. disabilities.

The report specified the need for retirement housing to be designed to include facilities which allow those with reducing mobility to maintain an independent lifestyle for as long as possible. Our new purpose-built homes do this and have, for example, wet rooms and walk-in showers.

The fact is we have an ageing population so in the years to come, all housing providers, whatever the sector they are in, will have a very important role to play, along with the Government in ensuring older people continue to have access to the housing they deserve.

Sunday, 15 May 2016

Start the bidding



I welcomed the recent news that the Government has approved funding for 8,000 units of specialist homes for older, disabled and vulnerable people.

The funding will form part of £4.7 billion in capital grants which will be disbursed for the shared ownership and affordable homes.

The two-bedroom bungalows we build and provide will come under this specialist category, so we are hopeful of being successful if, and when, we bid for money to deliver further affordable homes for older people in County Durham in the coming years.

Unfortunately, the money available on this ‘pot’ only represents 4% of the overall funding package, with the majority being focused on shared ownership and starter homes.

Whilst helping people onto the property ladder must be applauded, there will be a definite bias in the south where this kind of equity is more in demand.

Another big unknown is what is going to happen to the proposed Local Housing Allowance cap for Housing Benefit. The Government is currently reviewing this, and we are hopeful for a favourable outcome, but if the cap is instigated at the same level as people in privately rented homes, it could make bidding for the new development money almost pointless.

This would be because the rents required to sustain investment in the homes would be likely out of the reach of residents on full housing benefit.

We hope this is not the case, however, and that we can successfully bid for money to enable us to continue to provide the high quality older peoples’ homes that we are renowned for.

Friday, 26 February 2016

Is this the end for the bedroom tax?



This week could well signal the end of the so-called bedroom tax.

A group of five families are going to The Supreme Court in a bid to prove the bedroom tax discriminates against disabled adults - a case that could have major ramifications for the entire system.

The introduction of the bedroom tax in 2013 was always controversial and like all housing associations, it has affected residents of Durham Aged Mineworkers’ Homes Association.

The Government argued that it would encourage people to move to smaller properties, potentially saving around £480 million a year from the housing benefit bill. That is all well and good, and in many respects a good thing as far as the economy is concerned, but I have always maintained that the Government failed to see the bigger picture.

The bigger picture being that it’s fine to say in principle that people should move to smaller properties, but in reality there are not enough homes to meet this need. That is not just down to the current Government, but also a number of previous Governments who have simply not done enough to build more new homes.

In 1970 378,000 new homes were completed and by 2014 that figure had fallen to 141,000. Given people are now living much longer than before, that for me, pretty much sums it up.

In our part of the world, high quality two-bedroom homes are in big demand and whilst ourselves, and others, are doing what we can, it is almost impossible to meet this need.

So, if an elderly couple, for example, are living in a three or four-bedroom family home, they may want to move to a smaller property (and not just because of the bedroom tax), but if there is nothing suitable to move in to, why should they be penalised financially for this?

We will obviously have to wait and see what happens with the legal process, but in the meantime I would urge the Government to do more to help social housing providers like ours to build more new homes – as much as we would like to, we can’t do it on our own!


Wednesday, 3 February 2016

The Sword of Damocles



The Government recently exempted Almshouses (and all supported/sheltered housing) from the rent reduction for the first year 2016.

As an Almshouse, this is welcome news for Durham Aged Mineworkers’ Homes Association, and many others but there is still a sword of Damocles hanging over all our heads – in the form of a proposed cap on housing benefit.

From April 2017 the Government is proposing to make housing benefit payable on housing association properties to the same level as people in privately rented homes, known as the Local Housing Allowance.

This will make a massive difference to supported housing schemes where weekly housing benefit-allowable costs are often £20-£30 or more higher than the LHA, and also generally in Durham County where the typical one-bedroom LHA rate is only £75/week compared to the rent of our new bungalows of £106/week.

If this does happen it will have a major impact on the social housing sector. According to the National Housing Federation, this change would hit vulnerable people by an average of £68 a week and at least 82,000 homes for these groups would be forced to closed.

Restricting the housing benefit of those least able to source any additional income makes absolutely no sense and threatens the provision of this much needed specialist housing, just as the number of older people in our region is rapidly increasing.  The impact of a lack of appropriate housing for older people on the NHS is well publicised, and this funding cut therefore appears to be one that will rapidly end up actually costing the taxpayer more.

A typical example would be a new 2-bedroom bungalow, offered at £106 per week “affordable rent” (a rent set under HCA guidelines from 2012) being restricted to LHA rent of £86.30 per week, or potentially even only £74.79 per week if the “single room” rate restriction was extended to older people as it may well be.

Clearly most pensioners entitled to full housing benefit could not find an extra £30 or £40 per week to top up their housing benefit shortfall, and so would risk falling into arrears, with all the adverse problems that would entail.  Of course, it also means that any investment in future rented properties for older people makes no real financial sense.

Capping housing benefit for vulnerable and older people not only means that future investment cannot take place as the limited income will not be available to sustain any sort of meaningful investment in specialist housing, but also threatens the continued existence of what provision already exists and so appears to be highly irresponsible.

We therefore join with the NHF in urging the Government to think again and announce now that the LHA cap does not apply to supported and sheltered housing and that they will work with the sector to develop a long term sustainable funding model for supported housing.

Monday, 4 January 2016

Heroes among us


The people living in our homes have some wonderful stories to tell.

One of the best we came across recently concerns a man called George Walker, who lives in one of our homes in Consett.

In 1960 George, was heading south on the A1, near Thirsk, to deliver a lorry full of heavy steel bars. Suddenly, a trailer which was carrying workmen broke free from the truck carrying it and swerved in front of him.

Realising in all likelihood that the men would be killed if he didn’t take action, George swerved his vehicle off the road.

Hitting the verge at speed caused the steel bars he was carrying to fly through the front of the cab and one of them went right through his leg, pinning him to vehicle.

George was rushed to hospital and it was initially thought his leg would need to be amputated, but luckily doctors managed to save it and after a long recovery he was eventually able to return to driving.

When news of his bravery got out, George received The Order of Industrial Heroism, a private civil award given by the Daily Herald newspaper to recognise the deeds of valour of those who had saved their fellow workers from danger or death. It was popularly known as the "Workers' VC”.

The award was given out from 1923 to 1964 (when the Daily Herald ceased publishing) and only 440 people were honoured with it, many of them posthumously. George was the 401st person to receive it.

Like me, I am sure many of you were unaware that such an award existed, but I think it’s wonderful that ‘normal’ people were recognised for bravery in this way and whilst similar awards are still given out now, it’s nice to know one of our residents is part of an elite club.

If you know anyone else who has also received this award, I would love to find out more.

Wednesday, 18 November 2015

Step back in time


On Housing Day I wanted to share this with you.

In 1915 our predecessors in the Boldon branch of the Association were proud to unveil a new development of bungalows for retired mineworkers at Marsden Road, South Shields.

It was ahead of its time, with internal baths and toilets provided decades before such amenities became commonplace elsewhere.

This year we have been honoured to work with Beamish Museum – the living museum of the North of England - who are replicating a block of these homes as part of a new visitor attraction in their ongoing project to portray the history of the region.

The plan is to effectively re-build four of our bungalows as part of a new 1950s town attraction. Two of the replicated homes would host pioneering sessions for people living with dementia, older people, and their families and carers - building on acclaimed work already done by the museum.

We are flattered and delighted to have been approached to help with the project and it will be fantastic to see some of our properties replicated at the Museum. It is even more pleasing that our own residents have been consulted about the project and much of their feedback will be incorporated as part of the scheme.

We have many residents who will remember what it was like living in the 1950s, or perhaps there are people who have been handed down objects from this decade, so as well as having our homes at the Museum it will also be great for the memories and mementos of our residents and their families to be part of this fantastic project.

We are incredibly proud that the farsightedness of our predecessors is being recognised in this way and that the contribution our homes have made and continue to make to the wellbeing of the people of the coalfield communities in the North East of England is so valued.

We are even more proud, however, that such achievements are not mere relics of the past.  Our Marsden Road homes, along with many properties, have been modernised over the years and continue to be enjoyed and valued by residents to this day, and the tradition of innovation and quality that was set by their builders all those years ago in the early years of the 20th century is maintained today in the 21st.

I will of course, continue to keep you update, via the blog, on the progress of the scheme.